Friday Night Classic: Stormy Weather (1943)

On Tuesdays, I run a classic film screening. On Fridays, I write about these movies.

This week’s film: Stormy Weather (1943) – directed by Andrew L. Stone; starring Lena Horne and Bill Robinson.

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Luminarium Dance Debuts “Mythos: Pathos”

(L to R) Jessica Jacob, Jess Chang, Rose Abramoff, Hannah Hildreth, Mark Kranz, and Melenie Diarbekirian in “Seirēn” for “Mythos: Pathos”. Choreography by Merli V. Guerra. Photo by Ryan Carollo.

On August 3 and 4, Luminarium Dance Company debuted its latest project Mythos:Pathos at the Center for the Arts at the Armory in Somerville, MA. The new work offers a contemporary take on lesser known characters and stories from Greek mythology. Like Luminarium Dance’s previous showcases, the combination of unique lighting design and innovative staging creates exhilarating and unexpected pieces. Continue reading “Luminarium Dance Debuts “Mythos: Pathos””

Luminarium Dance Company Showcases Landmark First Season With Y.E.S.

Amyko Ishizaki in "Upon" - Steph Hodge Photography

I never know what to expect when Luminarium Dance Company presents new work, . With every Luminarium piece I see, there is always something different and exciting evolving on the stage. Co-artistic directors Merli V. Guerra and Kimberleigh A. Holman are unafraid to take bold risks and explore multiple mediums – film, sound, design – through dance. The result, as seen in Luminarium’s recent showcase, is once again something marvelous.

Y.E.S – A Year End Show on Nov. 4 and 5 at Green Street Studios in Cambridge, MA celebrated Luminarium Dance Company’s first season. Since the company’s debut performance “Fracture” in November 2010, Luminarium Dance has presented new work at a variety of venues and festivals including Boston Center for the Arts, Mobius, and the Seacoast Fringe Festivalin Portsmouth, NH. Beyond these various shows and festivals, Luminarium also partnered with the Boys and Girls Clubs of Boston to present LEAP: Leading and Engaging Artistic Pursuits.

Y.E.S. showcased the growth that Luminarium Dance has experienced throughout this formative year. The company has grown in size as have the audiences but the work remains just artistically challenging and impressive. The six pieces featured in Y.E.S. ranged in style, concept, and scope. No matter how Guerra and Holman approached their work, both choreographers seemed to be addressing one concept: how a community is created through dance.  Continue reading “Luminarium Dance Company Showcases Landmark First Season With Y.E.S.”

My Week in Film: April 24 to April 30

This is a new feature on the blog. (And hopefully one I keep up with.) In an attempt to keep busy, focused, and actual records of what I watch, I’m going to write blurbs about the movies I see every week. I would say that I am doing this  to share with my many (hah) readers the vast number of films I watch but that’s a lie. I really just want to stop watching shows about the Kardashians and serial killers. I’m worried that this combination will have a detrimental impact on my psyche fairly soon.

So, it is on, Soderbergh!

Continue reading “My Week in Film: April 24 to April 30”

YouTube Gem: Ginger Rogers and Lucille Ball Dance the Charleston

When I quickly researching Stage Door last night, I stumbled upon this glorious YouTube gem. From 1971, it is Ginger Rogers and Lucille Ball dancing the Charleston in the sitcom Here’s Lucy. It is pure bliss. Enjoy.

I’ve watched this a few times now and Ginger’s line as she leaves, “Please, please become a Katharine Hepburn fan,” just makes me giggle with delight. Even more having watched Stage Door, which stars all three actresses, just last night.

And how does Ginger’s Charleston above compare to her Charleston in Roxie Hart from 1942? It is pretty damn good.